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Working with a Personal Injury Attorney

by  on  News & Resources

When you are injured by another person or party, you may face any number of financial headaches — medical expenses, insurance premiums, repairs for your car or other possessions, loss of income, credit card bills and more. In most personal injury cases, restitution is crucial because many injured parties simply don’t have the resources to cover unexpected medical bills and surgical expenses related to a car accident or bad fall without experiencing serious financial repercussions.

This is where personal injury lawsuits come into play. Covering your own expenses when you’ve caused an accident or injury is expected, but when someone else is at fault, the financial responsibility may be placed on them instead of you.

But victims of personal injury accidents often have no idea what they’re getting into when they file their lawsuits and they need the guidance of an experienced injury lawyer to take them through the process. Filing a lawsuit of any kind is an extensive, expensive process filled with uncommon language and processes, as well as a variety of legal requirements.

What Do You Have to Pay?

Obviously, a common concern for victims of personal injury accidents is cost, primarily because their medical bills are through the roof, they had to have emergency surgery after a car accident, the car is totaled, and they had to pay to have it towed and pay for a rental car to use in the meantime. If you try to add in your legal expenses (consultation costs, lawyer’s retention, court fees, etc.), you may be thinking that you can’t afford a personal injury lawsuit, no matter what you could potentially receive in restitution.

Most personal injury attorneys work on a contingency basis, which typically means that if you don’t win your case, your attorney won’t seek payment from you. However, if you do win your case and receive restitution from the party who caused the accident, you would be expected to pay your attorney a portion or percentage of your recovery amount.

What Will Your Attorney Need from You?

Your attorney will need to go over the events of the accident with you. For instance, if you were late on your way to work and you were speeding when you were hit, your attorney needs to know that. If you were distracted and didn’t see an oncoming driver in your lane, you need to tell your attorney. Even if your actions did not cause the accident, your attorney needs to be aware of any potential issues the defense might use against you.

Additionally, your attorney will need a full report of your injuries, including your medical records. You may also need to go over your prior medical history with your attorney, as that information may be requested from the insurance adjuster or defense team. Your attorney will be able to tell you what information if any, you need to provide to the other side.

A personal injury lawsuit may seem intimidating when you first begin, but for most victims, it is well worth the time and effort to cover their expenses and receive restitution. To discuss your case, contact an attorney at Levine Law, a leading Denver personal injury law firm, today.